Finishing Well

Dec. 26, 2021

Scripture Readings

As we enter the last week of 2021 many of us reflect on a year of dashed dreams and lost opportunities. What will be the lingering impact of the Covid 19 pandemic? These questions form the backdrop behind us as we consider what 2022 might hold. In the coming days, the practice of committing to New Year’s resolutions will cross our minds and in that regard a couple of our daily readings can certainly head us in the right direction! Specifically I am reflecting upon what it means to have a character of influence (Proverbs) and a commitment to rebuild that which is broken (Nehemiah.)


Our reading in Proverbs describes the influence of a godly wife and woman of influence. It is good to sit and reflect on the characteristics of a person with such a noble character as we look to the New Year. She is one who cares for those within her household and beyond, including the needy. Such a person gains the confidence of others and brings them good rather than harm. She is industrious with her time and works vigorously to care and provide for those around her. A joyful spirit and a wise disposition flow from her life. Above all, she fears the Lord and her children called her blessed.  Now who doesn’t want to experience a life like that… God willing we will in 2022!


In Nehemiah we see a man who is committed to rebuild the foundations of his people, despite the opposition who don’t want to see the work completed. They are the naysayers who always want to interrupt and tear down both the work and person committed to rebuilding, and to leading others towards a hope and a future. Since the start of the pandemic, I’ve noticed this struggle throughout society and even in the church. May we commit to build up relationships, our community and our church into the New Year!


I invite you to join me as we finish 2021 ‘well’ by positioning ourselves to become people known for displaying a godly character, committed to rebuild, in our world, those places and relationships that have been broken down by the pandemic.


Tim Beadle